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Quarterly Data Summary Issue 12: Learning from reporting - how has incident reporting changed?

Learning from reporting - how has incident reporting changed?
Reference number
0926F1
Issue date01 May 2009
TypeData report

This learning from reporting section, taken from Quarterly Data Summary Issue 12, focuses on how incident reporting to the National Reporting and Learning Service has changed since 2005.

 

This feature considers data reported from acute trusts in England only. The analysis includes incidents reported as occurring between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2008 and divided trusts into four groups based on their reporting rate per 1,000 admissions. Particular focus is given to the proportion of incidents reported as severe harm or death, and the most commonly reported incident type: slips, trips, and falls. 

 

The feature covers:

  • The research methodology.
  • Reporting rate among acute trust types.
  • Severe harm and death incidents.
  • Reported incidents of slips, trips, and falls.

 

It concludes that the likely causes of the substantial increase in reporting rates between 2005‑06 and 2007‑08 among all acute trust types is both strengthened reporting processes and improved safety culture. It indicates a changing patient safety culture within trusts rather than a greater number of safety problems.

 

Further work is needed to improve our understanding of the underlying reasons reporting rates differ across trusts, and how patterns of reporting reflect the level of maturity of reporting systems.


Quarterly Data Summary 12 learning from reporting how has incident reporting changed
Quarterly Data Summary 12 learning from reporting how has incident reporting changed - 591 KB 0926-F1 - Quarterly Data Summary 12 learning from reporting how has incident reporting changed - 2009-05 - V1